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What are YOUR Grocery Price Points? (Plus, My New Printable Spreadsheets!)

The links in the post below may be affiliate links. Read the full disclosure.

UPDATE – If you’d rather, you can go here and save the Price Points document to your computer and edit/change the prices based on your region! :D  Enjoy!

Have you ever wondered if you’re paying too much for your groceries or if you’re really getting the best deal?  Or have you wondered exactly what you should be paying for items such as meat, fresh produce, diapers, or other grocery items?  Well I am excited to announce that I’ve finally compiled a price points spreadsheet with “Hip” prices for some of the most common grocery, food, household, and other items. Just click on this link or on the image below to print or save the PDF file to your computer!

Keep in mind that these prices will vary greatly based on your region, but should be a general indicator of good prices for most areas.  This would be a great document to print, put in plastic sleeves, and place in your coupon binder so you can glance at it while shopping. :)

I’ve also received quite a few questions from readers about knowing when exactly is the best time of year to buy certain grocery or non-grocery items?  This new spreadsheet found here (or click on the image above) will show you the general “best time” of year to keep an eye out for sales on certain types of food or other non-grocery items.

* Now it’s your turn… what are your personal price points for grocery items?   How do you save on items, such as meat, produce, and other grocery products that are hard to find coupons for?

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Spread the word on a great deal:

209 Hip Readers Commented

  • coupon connie says:

    Thank you so much for this. I really appreciate the specifics. . .like cost per diaper! Quanity sometimes differs so much per brand, so this list is such a good tool.
    In the midwest, I have seen many of these prices (yea!), though not on a weekly basis! Great resource so I know what to shoot for and know when to buy extra! THANKS!

  • Ashley says:

    I also forgot to mention Collin, that butchers are a great way to save on meats if you have some in your area. There are two butcher shops here that strictly sell meats, home made sausage, etc. They both offer discounts on “bulk” buys, and what makes it even better is, if one is offering say (just as an example not really this cheap) 100lbs of your choice for $50 then the other shop usually tries to undercut them for 10% less. (one shop does 5% less and the other 10%) What we do is order for my house, a family friend who can’t leave his home due to health, and usually another family friend depending on how much and what promotion they are having. Splitting the order and the bill saves a lot! Next time we order our meats I’ll try to remember this post and break it down for you guys. We order enough meat (veal, beef, pork, etc) to last atleast 6 months and factor in any holidays that are coming up within those few months!

  • Rosalee says:

    have to ask- are these prices using coupons? There is no way these prices are even close to what I have to spend in southern Orange County, California- I couldn’t even get it with coupons probably. I guess groceries are really so much more expensive here :( If anyone has any advice on how to get close to these price points in this area I would so appreciate hearing any tips! thanks!

    • Caroline says:

      These are a general national average on low prices when you match a sale and use a coupon. Each area is different so you would have to tweak the list to suit your area. For example, my price point on cereal is $1.50 when I can match a sale and coupon. I don’t pay above that usually and when I can meet this point I stock up. HTH

      • Terri Marks says:

        glad you clarified that this is with a coupon….I was freaking out. I live in Wisconsin and never see sale prices this low….with a coupon…yeah.

    • Christina says:

      dont feel alone, NY is higher as well. I never get discouraged though because you can still find deals. sometimes collin would price target deals and they would be even cheaper here by .10 to .25 and very few .50 most of the time the clareance deals are not occuring here but then there are clareance deals nobody is posting. Though I have never been able to get any freebies on food here on a regular basis it is still nice to find the occasional. And new products seem to hit here when the coupons have expired making them free…there are still deals even if we have to look harder and wait longer :)

    • Amberly says:

      I’m in San Diego and there’s no way I could get these prices even with coupons either. When my mom was visiting me from Connecticut in January she couldn’t believe how expensive groceries are here. I guess SoCal is well above the national average yet again. This price list is still very helpful to try to get as close to those prices as possible. Thanks Collin!

    • Alaine says:

      Same for us here in MA… most of my prices with coupon and sale are much higher!!

    • Michelle says:

      My area Iowa doesn’t have a lot of grocery stores- not much competition. We have 3 chains Hyvee, Schnucks and Fareway. We have the big box stores Target, Kmart, Walgreens etc. None of the stores do double coupons or have a store card.

      I too saw some of the price points gasped- I would feel like I was in a fairy tale with 1.25 bacon.

      I used to feel bad I didn’t get through the roof saving, but I have gotten good deals by noticing cycles. Hyvee usually has shredded cheeese on sale for .99 every 3 months, milk every month and peanaut butter every spring. I also have gotten better at matching coupons for the sales and judging how much to stock up on.

      I guess my point is no matter where you live you can get good deals for that area. I need to feel good about what I can do, not feel bad about things I have no control over.

      • Michelle says:

        We don’t get the Target coupon fliers and the SS and RP rarely have the coupons listed for sales either!

      • Rosalee says:

        Thank you for all your responses to my question :) I am happy to know that I am not the only one that has a hard time even getting even somewhat near these price points with coupons and sales. I so appreciate Hip2Save, it has helped me so much!

        • Laura says:

          I just moved to orange county and I used to live in Georgia. Believe it or not you really can find similar prices to what I used to spend in Georgia. I would have to say gas is crazy expensive here, but you can still find deals to receive cents per gallon off with reward points and store promotions to get the price down close to what I would spend in Georgia. for instance, if I shop at ralphs and spend $200 I get 20 cents off a gallon and then I also have a shell rewards card that gives me cents off as well. however, produce here is so much cheaper than Georgia! be proud that your state grows such fabulous produce at such great prices because that is not the same in other states! some things are more expensive like milk and meat, however I can find deals on that also by looking for free milk promotions and organic sales on prices of meat or manager specials. yes cost of living here is higher, however my grocery budget has not changed for my family since moving here by using websites like southerncalisaver.com or sites like this one to price match flyer sales promotions with coupons. prices national even out based on where your products are coming from. I shop at Ralphs and Vons which are extremely comparable to what I would spend at Kroger and Publix in the south. I would use this price comparison sheet in knowing these coupon sites. by looking at this list you can determine if the price is close to the price on a deal and whether it is worth using your coupons for. if its close to the rock bottom amount, go for it; its a great deal. for instance at vons there is a deal for 1.50 post cereal and free milk when you buy 4. there is also a coupon for post cereals. so I would go to this list and vons cereal deal is cheaper than the price listed so I know its an amazing deal. usually within .50 every time in my experience can I find a deal that week within this price range. if its a couple dollars more maybe you could get it cheaper and should save your coupon for a better deal down the road. that’s my take on it. hope my post brings light to price comparison and how great providing this list is for everyone no matter where you live.

  • Sarah says:

    Amazingly, a lot of these prices are pretty close to what I pay here in Arkansas!! Some prices on the list are so low I have never seen them anywhere (or I used to see them when I first started couponing 2 1/2 years ago and they have gone up SEVERELY), but a lot of them are pretty close to what I pay on a regular basis after price-matching and/or coupons. I actually pay less than $1 for bread. I have found Ozark Hearth brand bread at Harps here in Arkansas for $0.99 regularly (It is extremely good bread and my hubby calls me a bread snob because I can’t stand store brand bread!!!! ;) ). I also watch the sales for our other local stores and I can usually find that same bread on sale periodically for $0.69. I really stock up and freeze it then!!! (The prices are probably so low down here because we have probably one of the lowest costs of living and one of the lowest average salaries of all the 50 states!!!)

    • Sarah says:

      Oh, and I actually got Hiland yogurt for FREE this past Saturday because one of the local grocery stores had it on sale Saturday only 3/$1 and there was a $0.50/3 coupon a few weeks ago in the SmartSource insert that the store doubled. Meaning that I only had to pay tax for my yogurt!!! I was SUPER pumped!!! (My hubby thought I was NUTS ;) )

  • Courtney says:

    Tha you so much for this! This really helps me out more than I can tell you. Thank you for taking the time!

  • Sarah says:

    OMGosh. I was JUST thinking I needed to do a search for something JUST like this. Thanks so much.

  • Ashley says:

    Thank you for this!

  • Keri says:

    Thanks Collin! I save on produce by ordering it through a co-op called Bountiful Baskets. For $15.00 you get a round laundry size basket of fruit & veggies ea. They’re not in all states but they’re in many. I think they have a Facebook page, & the website is bountifulbaskets.org
    I swear by them & I know how popular they’re here in AZ!

  • Caroline says:

    I looked into this before and unfortunately they were not in MO. I was disappointed as a friend loves their produce. I think they were only on the West coast.

  • Becky says:

    This is so nice … thank you!!

  • Lindsey Birth says:

    I normally do not leave comments, but this post more than deserved it. I have been using coupons for a little over 2 years now, and I have gotten accustomed with price points for certain items, such as toilet paper, cereal, milk, etc. However, with the busy schedule that I’m sure all of us lead today, its hard to stop and think about what you should be paying for something when its the end of a long day at work and you only need some eggs and lunch meat. I know I’m not the only one who has made a quick trip to the store and thrown in the “bare necessities” without every pulling out a coupon or thinking twice about the price. This list will help my family tremendously. I have printed both documents, the 9 page price points and the list of items to buy throughout the year. I made 2 copies, one for at home when I plan my trips and one for the car when I just need to pick up a few things and still save the most money possible. You are such a loving and wonderful person Collin! Keep up the great work with this website and know that your efforts are appreciated by many! :)

  • Sandra Rising says:

    I live in the surburbs of Houston, Texas. I shop at Walmart and diligently price match. I also shop at Kroger to take advantage of their senior discount. I coupon. I haven’t seen groceries at these price points in years!! I think this list is misleading and unrealistic.

    • KRISTEN says:

      READ the other comments! this is the price with a sale AND (most likely) a coupon…..I LOVE THIS LIST!! THANK YOU!!

    • Shauna says:

      And…at the very least, it is a starting point from which you can develop your own list. Take it with you on your next shopping trip and as you purchase each item, make a note as to what you paid and if you think it was a really good deal or just an okay price. Then, the next time you purchase each item, compare the price to what you previously paid. Adjust your price point and your notes accordingly. It may take a few months and several trips to the store, but eventually you will have a price point list that will be accurate for your area and which you can use to determine best price and value. Once your basic list is done, you can customize further with additional items the aren’t included on the list above.

      No one else’s list is ever going to be applicable to your needs in every way. But, like I said at first, the list here gives us a great place to start marking our own prices and determining our individual price points. Take what you can use and ignore the rest.

  • KRISTEN says:

    my price points are actually a lot lower then most of these….ive been couponing for almost 5 years now and i have become SOOOOO cheap!! sometimes its frustrating because if i need to buy something right then and dont have a coupon but know i could get it for way cheaper i feel like crap….but i do love all the savings i get!!!

  • Stacy R. says:

    Thank you so much for doing this, Collin!
    You do all the hard work for us – THANK YOU!!!!!!

  • carrie says:

    This is interesting, and helpful to see. Since I’m shopping for just myself, I don’t really have price points, per se. Plus, I don’t eat meat, am picky about my cleaning and health & beauty products (must be “green” and not tested on animals) and am brand loyal on some things. So, if something is a good deal, and I know I’ll use it I stock up.

    I do have 2 cats and 2 dogs and I’d be interested to see others’ price points on premium pet foods. I do what I can with coupons and online sales to save where I can, but that stuff still expensive!

  • Printing tip, I edited my list down to 8 pages, then set printer to print 4 pages per sheet, and printed back to back – I sheet of paper, folded & fits neatly in my planner!

  • LMG says:

    Hello, I was a little confused by the diaper price points…it recommended $5.99 or $0.12 a diaper for name brand jumbo packs. But assuming a jumbo pack has anywhere from 26-36 diapers (e.g, Huggies), isn’t that more? Have jumbo packs gotten smaller since this list was put together? thanks for the help!

  • Tiffany says:

    I’m unsure of which prices to record. Do I document every product (brand, size, price) or is there some sort of estimate I should take down?

  • Judith says:

    Colin, I have a question. On the allergy medicine, I see the price point at $3.50 for adults. Is that per daily dose? Or for 5, 10, or 20 capsules?

  • coachky says:

    Hi Colin – I just discovered this post – what a gold mine! Thank you for the legwork you did so we can have this information. Quick question – is there any way you can make this available on your app? I would love to have this information at my fingertips when I’m shopping.

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