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To Tip or Not To Tip?! Check out the FREE Interactive Tip Guide and Share Your Thoughts

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I posted this topic last June and it generated such an awesome discussion amongst Hip2Save readers! So… I thought I would re-highlight this topic for those of you who are new to the site or may have missed this post last year.

Although I am an avid couponer and am always looking for ways to cut back on spending, I am NOT cheap when it comes to tipping. As a former waitress, I know how important tips are in the lives of those who work in service-based industries. Although I almost always tip at least 20% when dining out, I am sometimes a little more perplexed as to what to tip in the following situations: Purchasing food to-go, Hair Cut for yourself and/or your kiddos, Assistance with baggage when staying at a hotel, Purchasing espresso from Drive-Thru Coffee Shop, etc.

Needless to say, I was excited to discover the Interactive Tip Guide created by a design team over at Hospitality Management Schools. Just head on over here, scroll down to the orange Tip Guide button at the bottom of the page, and then select a category (choose from travel, cosmetics, restaurants and more). This guide tells you how much to tip, when to present the tip, and even has some basic tipping rules:

* Do tip pre-tax.
* Do tip at buffets.
* Do tip when using a discount or voucher like Groupon.
* Don’t tip the owner.
* Don’t tip extra when gratuity is already added on the bill.
* Don’t leave a bad tip if you plan on visiting the establishment again.

So take some time to check out the guide and then come back and share your thoughts. Think about the following questions: What services do you believe require a tip, how much do you tip, do you tip even if the service is horrible etc?

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354 Hip Readers Commented

  • Kara says:

    The minimum wage for any server is NOT $2.13. It is $7.25 an hour in most states. This is because of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), which states that a tipped employee must receive the federal minimum wage. I understand that it is a stressful job but what about other careers that are more stressful. Do we tip firefighters or police officers? A server is doing a job just like the rest of us and should only be paid according to the service they provide. Do you tip teenagers that work at Burger King or the cashier at Wal-mart? No we do not because it is their job but they can make less than a server.

    • Roxanne says:

      I can tell you that two states I have worked in I only made 2.13 an hour, NONE of which I saw because 100% goes to taxes, and I still owe money at the end of the year.

    • Amber P says:

      No this is not a true statement I served for 2.13 an hour and never saw one penny on a paycheck for four years. If I can’t affod to tip then I can’t afford to eat out.

    • sabrina says:

      Not True!

    • Mary says:

      I am a server in Ohio. I make $2.13 plus tips

    • Kristen says:

      not true! Where I work waitresses make $2.13 an hour plus tips

    • Ashley says:

      Not true in Florida

      • Kara says:

        The FLSA establishes minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping, and youth employment standards affecting employees in the private sector and in Federal, State, and local governments. Covered nonexempt workers are entitled to a minimum wage of not less than $7.25 per hour effective July 24, 2009. Overtime pay at a rate not less than one and one-half times the regular rate of pay is required after 40 hours of work in a workweek.
        FLSA Minimum Wage: The federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour effective July 24, 2009. Many states also have minimum wage laws. In cases where an employee is subject to both state and federal minimum wage laws, the employee is entitled to the higher minimum wage. (http://www.dol.gov/whd/flsa/)
        Tip Credit: Section 3(m) of the FLSA permits an employer to take a tip credit toward its minimum wage obligation for tipped employees equal to the difference between the required cash wage (which must be at least $2.13) and the federal minimum wage (currently $7.25). Employers must provide oral or written notice to tipped employees of the use of the tip credit in advance. 29 C.F.R. § 531.59(b). Employers using the tip credit must be able to show that tipped employees receive at least the minimum wage when direct wages and the tip credit amount are combined. If the employee’s tips combined with the direct wages do not equal the minimum wage, the employer must make up the difference. For general information on tipped employees, please see Fact Sheet #15: Tipped Employees Under the FLSA.

        • krystal says:

          Kara, you clearly have never worked at a restaurant before. As a server, you are only paid $2.15 an hour, the rest of your salary comes from tips. Servers also have to give a percentage to the bussers and hosts. So, if you do not tip a server, they still have to tip out to the other employees, which means they are paying to serve you. You don’t tip cashiers, firefighters, and police officers because they make at least minimum wage, servers don’t.

    • dayna says:

      Not true. In Pa servers are paid 2.13/hr but must show at least 7.25… which means that since it is a tipped based industry they MUST makeup the rest in gratuity. They pay taxes on 7.25/hr regardless if they really make it or not… they are expected to claim any cash tips also… not all do.. but the government is NOT stupid and can figure out based on the servers sales and take an average of that.. so if their sales are 100.00 a fair percent would be estimated at about 15% for the server to claim. SO if the credit card tips do not make up that percent.. the state expects that server should have the difference made up in cash declared. I work in F&B and have for over 15 years. In some countries (UK) Servers/ Bartenders get a SALARY and therefore are NOT tipped. NOT SO IN THE US.. Please tip for good service :)

      • dayna says:

        OH and IF they do exceed the rest is taxed also… AND please don’t forget MOST servers do not have access to any 401K, medical, dental, life insurance, or disability. SO if they slip on your childs’ milk, break their arm, or break their leg… NO work=No pay=No income. Alot of servers that I know are students, single mothers, and college grads who can’t find work in this economy. The others are very good at what they do and are F&B professionals.

        • lindsey says:

          Thank you Dayna for pointing out the TRUTH! So many states do pay $2.13/hr for servers and you are right, they do not have any insurance of any sort and they are paying more in taxes than they are earning per hour. Obviously those that read books about the laws haven’t worked in the industry and know nothing about it.

      • Tonya says:

        Exactly

    • Mary says:

      I am not trying to start a fight with the above poster of this comment, however It is because of misinformed people that actually believe that waiters and waitresses make more than $2.13 an hour that many of them get stiffed. My son is a waiter in Albuquerque, New Mexico and only makes $2.13 an hour. He never sees a penny on his pay check, because all of it is taken in taxes by the federal government. The ONLY pay he receives is thorough tips. If people go out to eat, they should budget in enough to properly tip the poor waiters and waitresses that bust their butts to bring you the relaxation of a night out away from cooking, serving and cleaning. Please be kind to your server and they will return the favor.

    • Alyssa says:

      I was under the impression that there is a minimum wage the employer must pay ($2.13) and then they expect the employee to make up the rest in tips. So it’s thought they’re making the $7.25 between the starting wage and another $5 in tips

    • Jl says:

      I make only 2.13 an hour as a server. Polices officer and firefighters get insurance and benefits which ads up to more than minimum wage. They do a job that an not be put into a dollar amount. Some deserve a lot more. Comparing these two jobs is silly. Bottom line the reason that the burden of paying most of the server’s income falls on the customer is simple. It should be considers part of the cost of the meal. Not optional. If owners paid server’s a fair wage no one could afford to out.

      • Marlena says:

        well my husband has done both – waiting tables and being a police officer . And believe it or not waiting tables he made more money than he makes as a cop ! If you work at a busy restaurant you make good money .
        As a cop he does not get health insurance for free, we pay $600 a month in just the insurance? That’s not counting all the co-pays and deductibles ! It is ridiculous how dangerous and important his job is and how much money he brings home :(

    • ray says:

      I have been a server for many years. I work in AZ now, where I get payed $4.80 an hour. This is on the HIGH end of the spectrum for people in the service industry. As most states are still under $3.00 an hour. So say I work 8 hours and make no tips, , I am making under $40 a day. Also I am fortunate enough to work for a corporation that I am able to receive health insurance through, after insurance and taxes my take home pay on my check for 2 weeks is usually about $0-$20. So while tipping is not mandatory, I hope you can see why it helps greatly. I don’t know of any people who can survive on a $10 a week, or $40 a month or if you want to get real deep, less than $1000 a year.

    • Chris says:

      CA requires the employee to pad the tipped minimum wage of $4.50 up to the $8 state minimum wage. But, it appears other states have different policies including those that do not require the employer to meet the typical state minimum wage.

    • Cindy says:

      It’s not true in Florida. Here, they only receive the $7.79 or whatever it is per hour if their tips don’t cover the minimum wage amount (I believe). Otherwise it is the $3 something per hour.

      • Kara says:

        I have also done this job before and if you calculator your pay after your tips you do make minimum federal/state wage. If you do not, your employer should be paying you the difference on your paycheck. Some businesses might be cutting corners around the FLSA but that is the responsibility of the worker to know their rights. If you are not making the federal/state minimum wage after tips, than my question is why are you doing this job?

    • wassermanjulia@gmail.com says:

      I have been a server in three states, and none of them paid minimum wage. I have never earned more than 2.75 per hour. Tipping is part of the dining out experience. If you don’t want to tip then you have no business going somewhere where you get waited on.

    • Samantha says:

      Some states yes, most states no: http://www.dol.gov/whd/state/tipped.htm

      • jordan says:

        thanks for posting this site. It clearly shows that there is a maximum tip credit against minimum wage. You’ll see that maximum tip credit plus hourly rate in non minimum wage states is the minimum wage! Therefore every employee takes home minimum wage in one form or another.

    • jordan says:

      Sheesh kara I’m sorry people are trashing your comment because they can’t understand a little math. As a waiter you are guaranteed minimum wage. Are tips included in this calculation? HELL YES!! The point is if you divide the total of your tips and hourly pay, by the hours you work, it should equal at least minimum wage. If not you are entitled to an ajustment. Make sense? It’s the law people so if you are a waiter – and you still think this comment is untrue then go sue your boss.

    • tracy says:

      I am a waitress at red lobster and it is 2.13 so do not assume that.

    • Kristen says:

      The waitresses get paid $2.13 where I work plus tips. If they don’t make a certain amount of tips THEN they make minimum wage. Sooo, I think you’re first comment was kinda rude..I think we should tip our waitresses

    • Stephanie says:

      I agree that Kara was really rude on this topic! Servers do make a minimum wage of $2.13 an hour. The tips are there for a reason….to make it up to the fair pay that others make without tips. So no we don’t tip the Wal-Mart employee because they get a paycheck for the amount they work. The waitress relies solely on the tips. So if we take advice from Kara, the waitress would only make $2.13 an hour because she doesn’t do what a police officer does so therefor lets not tip her. This really makes no sense to even compare the jobs. I wish Kara was a server so we could all go let her wait on us ;)

      • Kara says:

        If you had read my previous comments, I was in this industry (people did tip me) and I did not say that we should not tip them. I actually do tip people no matter what type of service I receive. I was stating that based on FLSA, you should be making min wage after your tips are applied and if not than there is an issue. Please read links provided. People are in this industry because AFTER tips they make more than the min wage. If you are not making min wage AFTER tips plus any pay supplied by the employee, than why would anyone do this job

      • Ali says:

        I feel like that comment was rude.

    • Chris says:

      As many have stated above, your comment is uneducated and inflammatory. $2.13 is the base waiter/waitress pay rate for the majority of states. Obviously, due to FLSA, they cannot be paid just $2.13/hour. Any tips a waiter/waitress makes are added to the base pay rate. Therefore, if a server makes less tips than $5.12/hr, the establishment must make up the difference and increase the server’s pay up to minimum wage. There are times when a waiter/waitress may make over minimum wage. These are instances when the tips they receive are over $5.12/hr. Waiters/waitresses rely on your tips to make above minimum wage.

      I have worked as a server/bartender in the past for nearly 10 years. I just finished my Masters degree in Natural Resources and thankfully do not have to rely on tips anymore to make a living. Every profession has its stresses…so downplaying the stress level of waiters/waitresses is not very beneficial nor fair. I worked in a restaurant, country club, medium-sized hotel (Embassy Suites), large-sized hotel (Marriott), and a large resort hotel (Hyatt). Let me just explain to you that working in a restaurant is the bottom of the barrel as far as service jobs go. That is my personal experience. Someone else may have had a difference experience and may disagree. Relying on people leaving you tips is stressful in itself let alone having to deal with overworked managers who try their best but rarely treat their staff with as much respect as someone could find elsewhere in the service industry. Additionally, you have to relay orders of guests to kitchen staff that treat you with disdain any time you interrupt their cooking with a special order. On the flip side, if the kitchen screws up or takes too long cooking a guests food, the server is the one who generally pays the price in reduced tips and/or attitude from guests. The server is the messenger in between the kitchen and guest and often gets caught in the crossfire. Not to lay all of the blame for mistakes on kitchen staff or guests, servers regularly make mistakes just as much as anyone else. You have to keep a lot of orders straight in your head…especially when dealing with a busy Friday or Saturday night. Accidents/mistakes happen.

      All of that said, there are some servers who make a great deal of money. They are a rarity among a majority of the suburban-level restaurants out there. It all depends upon a number of issues:

      -whether tips are split among all staff including managers, food runners, bartenders, hostesses, etc.
      -if the restaurant is overstaffed a server may make less due to fewer tables
      -even in very nice establishments, a server may serve so few tables, they may not make enough tips to make a crazy amount of money

      The smart servers will learn how to tend bar and head over there. There is almost always more money being a bartender than as a server.

      After all is said and done, when I counted the amount of money I would make each night at a nicer restaurant (say about the level of an Outback), I generally walked out with anywhere from $7.25-$15/hr. The night where I made $15/hr were almost always a Friday or Saturday night…though that wasn’t always certain. Those night helped make up for the slow nights the rest of the week (Mondays are notoriously slow). I never made anywhere near what I felt I should be making considering the amount of work I was doing…especially in retrospect to other positions at other service industry jobs. Therefore, the next time you consider not tipping/undertipping/etc your waiter/waitress…consider the full picture of their job before doing so…and do so at your own peril…as I saw some nasty stuff happen to folks who treated their servers poorly.

      • lindsey says:

        AND most servers are only getting part-time hours so please consider that as well. Even if they do make $15/hr they may be only getting 20 hrs a week

    • Jano says:

      i agree with cara. $2.15 per hour?? are you guys kidding me…? IN WA it’s $9 and something.

    • toni says:

      hmmm, NOOOOOO the pay rate is 2.13 a hour for a server NOT 7.25 if you do not make 7.25 a hour from your tips THEN the company you work for has to give you a tip credit. IF YOU TAKE THIS TIP CREDIT YOU WILL NOT HAVE YOUR JOB VERY LONG!!!!

  • mel says:

    I struggle with how much to tip at buffet restaurants like Chuck o Rama or Golden Coral when the staff really don’t do anything but clear away your plates (if you’re lucky). We never know what to leave on a bill of $35, what do others leave? My ds is very generous, me not so much and I know its wrong I used to waitress, but I will only tip $5 whereas ds wants to tip more. Please help, I’m very curious what others do at buffet style restaurants. Thanks

    • Jessica says:

      At a buffet where all someone is doing is refilling your drink and (possibly) clearing the table, I just leave a couple dollars. At “regular” restaurants I usually tip 20-25%.

    • Cindy says:

      At buffets I still tip 15% at least since they are still doing a service for you, but at places like Sweet Tomatoes where you sit wherever you want and grab everything yourself (including drinks) but they clear the tables then I tip like $2 or $3.

    • Brenda says:

      I worked at a chinese buffet restaurant and always made good tips. I would make at least a couple bucks per person eating. But I think it was because I made it a point to learn names and learn the “regulars” drink orders. If all they do is take your drink and pick up a few plates then I would say no more then $5 for a party of 4-6. But if it’s one who comes and check and makes sure to clear your table the I say at least $5 even if it’s only 2 ppl.

    • kathy says:

      so this is years ago but i worked at a place like that and we got the crappy servers amount (ie todays $2.13 wage) and only usually go $1-2 no matter how many free deserts I got them.. I realize we didn’t usually bring out food but people trying to eat their moneys worth had lots of plates to pick up. Please tip like we gave you the bill that really the only difference.

    • Sherrie says:

      Servers are usually in charge of stocking the buffet as well as clearing your plates and keeping your drinks full.

    • Kyra says:

      we leave a $1 per person dining….so if we go with a party of 5 we would leave $5, if we go with a party of 2 we would leave $2

    • Melissa says:

      I used to work in a buffet and was thrilled when I was left $1 per person. However if you or your children make a huge mess, vomit, spill more than one drink etc… it was appreciated if a little more was left.

  • LizG says:

    I’ve served for years and it’s a demanding job. But, you should get good service and you should tip well for this service. If your check is $50, and you have a $10 off coupon, don’t forget, you should still tip 18% – 20% of the total bill meaning 8$-$10. If there’s a problem, I”m not a mind reader, please tell me. Don’t leave mad and don’t hesitiate to speak with a manager if there’s a big problem. If you’re just really hard to please or don’t want to tip, do us all a favor – get take out, drive thru, or cook for yourself. Don’t eat out and look for reasons to not tip me because you can’t afford to dine at my restaurant, don’t have enough money, or are just plain cheap. I really enjoy my job, but cheapos make my life miserable.

  • Dawn says:

    We tip, but I personally hate the thought that when we FINALLY decide to “splurge” on a night out (which is once every 3 or 4 months),that we have to make sure we have an extra $5-$7 in cash with us to eat. I think restaurants should just get with the program and pay their waiters/waitresses minimum wage like every other basic employee. Why are restaurants different that way? It’s a headache trying to make sure we’ve tipped right, and a couple times I know we haven’t tipped at all due to horrid “service”. And I don’t care if they had a “bad day”, I don’t per se expect any server to be all smiles and overjoyed that I’m there, just keep my water filled in a timely manner, thanks.

    • Dawn says:

      And same with the employees that clear tables. Sometimes they have to “share” tips? Sounds confusing. Pay people what they work for per hour, managers give raises as often and needed. Cut out tips altogether!

    • Jl says:

      You could not afford to eat out. Think of how much more it would cost if owners paid more. Tipping should be considered part of the cost of eating out.

    • Cindy says:

      Your meal would cost significantly higher then.

    • Dylan says:

      This is going to sound harsh, but if tipping bothers you on principle or if you can’t afford it, then you really shouldn’t be going out to eat at restaurants where there are servers. It is not fair to them to be cheated because you can’t afford it or disagree with this well-established, standard practice.

      There are some nice options for food that don’t involved being served at a table, or maybe for your night out you can eat at home first (food delivery drivers need to be tipped as well) and then do something fun like bowling or a movie. If you’ve felt justified for not leaving tips “a couple” of time due to horrid service, it’s possible your standards are too high.

    • Cara says:

      You should tip 15% no matter what, regardless of what kind of service you get. If the service is good, go up from there. It’s just how it works! You don’t have to like it, but it is how the restaurant industry in our country works. You know that you’ll have to tip, so you have to include that — either that or get it to go, so you save on drinks as well and only have to tip $2 or something to the person who brings it to your car.

      • Angie says:

        Sorry, I don’t think you should tip 15% regardless of the service you get. Doesn’t that defeat the purpose of tipping? All waiters–great and really bad–get rewarded the same? I have never heard that before.

      • susan says:

        I totally DO NOT agree with this statement. We tip BECAUSE of the service we get not b/c its assumed and mandated to do so. I will never ever tip a waiting staff for lousy service. I EARN my paycheck, and I expect the waiters/waitresses to earn theirs as well. End of story.

  • sabrina says:

    What about the Starbucks INSIDE of target? Never sure if I should tip b/c there is no tip jar?!?!

    • Jessica says:

      I don’t. I don’t tip at the drive-thru starbucks either. They’re getting paid to do their job just like everyone else. I’ve never understood why some people get tipped and others don’t.

    • Suzanne says:

      they’re not allowed to take tips if they’re inside a Target or Safeway because they’re considered their employees and not Starbucks

  • lj says:

    I’m sorry, but if my waitress does not come to check our table, or refill drinks, or even bring out our food (kitchen staff does it), I’m not tipping! Tips are to be earned! You are in a customer service industry. I totally agree with the person who said teachers and dr.s are not allowed to have “off days”. And even if you’re having an off day, you can still give people the curtesy of doing your job. I’ve had it happen a couple times where no one showed up to refill drinks and we could never “catch” another waiter to ask. (I HATE having to finish up a meal with no drink!) And, yes, I’ve been a waitress. I did make minimum wage, so I didn’t have to depend on tips. But that’s no excuse to give lousy service.
    Another thing my family has always done is to clean up our own table a little bit. I think it’s polite to “help” the waitress out if she’s doing a great job. Stack up your plates, putting the silverware on the top plate. Put the napkins on a neat pile, and clean up any trash (straw papers, etc). I feel it’s especially helpful when you have little kids, like I do. They can destroy a table in no time flat. (My daughter loves to dump out all the little sugar packets and line them all up on the table. But we always make her put them all back the way they were.)

    • Mary says:

      I agree that if you get terrible service, the tip should reflect the poor job. However, It is because of misinformed people that actually believe that waiters and waitresses make more than $2.13 an hour that many of them get stiffed. My son is a waiter in Albuquerque, New Mexico and only makes $2.13 an hour. He never sees a penny on his pay check, because all of it is taken in taxes by the federal government. The ONLY pay he receives is thorough tips. If people go out to eat, they should budget in enough to properly tip the poor waiters and waitresses that bust their butts to bring you the relaxation of a night out away from cooking, serving and cleaning. Please be kind to your server and they will return the favor.

    • ray says:

      What a lot of people fail to understand, is if kitchen staff brings food to a table, they are usually being tipped by the server to do so. It’s called expo and is a crucial job at most restaurants. Your server is more than likely running food to someone else’s table. In a restaurant, hot food is the #1 priority, so they don’t leave things sitting in a window to get cold whie they wait for the person whose table it is.

      • Jenn says:

        Words out of my mouth! My husband was the expo guy and his job was sooooo important! Food never went out cold! If no servers were available he would take off his apron and run the food out.

    • tracy says:

      I hope everyone understands that most servers have to tip out the bartender and the bussers. It comes off 2.2% for each of them so 4.4% of my total amount of sales goes out before I touch it. So remember when you decide not to tip someone because we lose money out of our other tips. So if you plan on stiffing you service stay at home because we bust our butts to serve rude people and yea sometimes it turns into a bad day.

    • lj says:

      I usually DO tip good at least 20%. Im just making a point that if i cant get 1 refill on my water, somethings wrong. It doesnt happen often but has happened. At least come over and apologize you didnt get around quick enough. One time several years ago, we had to ask for everything. She didnt bring us the rolls, we had to ask another waiter, never got refills on our drinks, never checked to see if we needed anything. Then we sat n waited n waited for our check.(20-30 min AFTER we were done eating). Didnt seem like anyone wouldve cared if we would ve slept there! In any other job if you dont do what is expected, you get fired.

    • fran says:

      At my restaurant you are required to bring out other servers food all the time. even if that person is en route to the kitchen . To not tip because someone else brought it is not right. They bring the food asap to keep it as hot as possible.

      • lj says:

        I understand that and I’m ok with someone else bringing the food out. Please re read my comment. My point was that once we had our drinks, WE DID NOT SEE OUR WAITRESS AGAIN, until she brought the check after we waited for it for about 30 min. THAT is what I deem unacceptable. NO ONE checked with us to make sure everything was ok or if we needed anything. Good grief. I LOVE the fact that someone else wanted to make sure we got our food while it was hot.

  • Debbie says:

    Kara better get her facts stright and shame on he for making everyone think that a server makes min. wage. That is not true. The wage for servers is alot lower becaue of their tips . And by the way yes we have to pay taxes on those tips. By the time they take out taxes on my tips I do not get a check so like i said Kara should get her facts stright. Thanks.

  • ipf32680 says:

    I tip very well but I base my tip on the level of service I receive. It is not my responsibility to take into consideration if the server is having a bad day for whatever reason. “Bad days/bad news” is a personal thing and if you MUST come to work then you MUST do your job correctly. My husband and I work VERY hard for our money and if we decide that we want to splurge and spend that money in an establishment, then we expect everything that goes along with it. I work dealing with people’s health insurance and I can’t very well say “Sir/Mam yeah sorry I cut your benefits off and your life saving surgery was cancelled. I was having a bad day.” That would NOT go over so well for any one involved. So that is definitely not something I would ever take into consideration as a reason for bad service. Also, I have been to places where the waiter/waitress takes the order and the servers bring out the food. Our waiter/waitress will be standing in a corner conversing with co-workers or disappear all together, never returning to the table to ask if we needed anything. The next time we see them is when they’re bringing the bill. Do they get a tip? Not from my pocket. And I will definitely explain to them why I am not leaving one. I shouldn’t have had to ask the people sitting across from me if I can borrow their steak sauce or ketchup because you never came back and I couldn’t find you. In situations like that I really try not to involve the managers because sometimes I really don’t know how far they will go as far as disciplining and it’s not usually a case where someone needs to be fired…therefore I just simply tell the waiter/waitress where they went wrong and hopefully they correct their actions. For the places that automatically add the gratuity to the check…I have VERY mixed feelings about this. I have been places where this is the case and service was over the top great and we left a tip in addition to the gratuity. Then there were two places where service was HORRIBLE. One place the waitress took our order and was never to be seen or heard from again (servers brought out our food) until we had to ask ANOTHER waitress to get our waitress for us. When she finally came to the table after 10 minutes, she came with bill in hand and put it on the table and walked away. Nothing said. This was a $350 bill…did she really deserve a $70 tip??? Suffice it to say she did NOT get a dime but instead the manager got an earful because we REFUSED to pay that bill until the gratuity was taken off! The other restaurant was a similar situation but we knew right away there was going to be a problem because the waitress decided she had to have a very important conversation with one of the servers about her upcoming vacation WHILE she was taking our order so basically while she was NOT writing down our orders (apparently she’s been there awhile and had the ability to mentally retain larger orders) we kept being interrupted every time she decided to laugh and talk to the server that just finish bringing food to the next table. On top of that 6 out of the 8 orders were completely wrong and the other two never got their food at all. Did I mention no one received their drinks??? Sometimes I think they think because they have a “guaranteed” tip, they don’t have to put forth as much effort but I surely will tell you if you are serving me, you better get another line of thought on that one because I rather pay my bail before I leave ANY of MY hard earned money on table for crappy service.
    I never penalize a waiter/server for kitchen error or slow food when I can clearly see it’s extremely busy. I will talk to a manager if I am unhappy with the service on that end. I only penalize a waiter/server for the part they play directly in my dining experience.

    • tracy says:

      And servers pay those people to run our food so if a waitress wants to take a break why not imagine yourself on your feet 10 hours a day because most of the time we do not get breaks to smoke or eat. We have to wait until the end of our shift to eat or smoke. The only time we get a chance to breath in between tables is when we get caught up so do not try to understand why people do what they do as long as you are taken care of.

      • ipf32680 says:

        That’s exactly the point that I’m trying to make…Take care of me! I don’t care who you are talking to for how long and where. But when I, your customer, have to ask the table next to me for condiments and napkins etc because you are NOT “taking care of me” is the problem. If you pay the servers to bring my food out, then so be it but service does not stop there. It is NOT my responsibility to ask another waiter to track you down or to get up from my seat to look for you. Am I wrong in assuming that it is the waiter’s job to “wait” on a table? Isn’t part of that job to ensure your customers have what they need to have a pleasant dining experience? I don’t need you to take a seat next to me but just come and check on me at least ONCE! I promise you it is not an exaggeration when I say I have had my order taken and never saw my waiter again until they were bringing me the bill! That is what I call unacceptable service. And tell me if you are in this industry, do you do that to your customers…honestly?

    • LOVE, LOVE, LOVE YOUR WHOLE COMMENT! :) that is exactly how i feel about it! :)

    • kristospherein says:

      Everything that may go wrong in an establishment is not the sever’s fault. There are many elements that can and do go wrong in a restaurant not under the server’s control. Good servers attempt to keep track of their food and make sure it goes out the way it is supposed to…but on busy Friday or Saturday nights, that is all but impossible. Also, there are times when a server may have ordered a steak correctly and the kitchen screwed it up…that is not the server’s fault…but is generally blamed on the server. You have to realize the amount of money servers are making on days when their establishment are slow (minimum wage) and consider the service you are getting compared to other places where you get food from folks getting paid minimum wage (McDonalds for example). It should put some service in perspective.

      • kristospherein says:

        Mistakes happen. People have off days. Your example trying to compare the insurance industry with the service industry is laughable. I’ve worked in both and there is no comparison. Have you ever considered you are a difficult person to serve? There is a wide range of folks out there with some requiring very little when they go out for a meal to those that require the server provide them stellar perfect service to merely be graced with a 15% tip (which is a slap in the face of a server). Until you work as a server, you have no idea what goes into their job. It is not as straightforward or as easy as you imply. The examples you provide sound like situations where a server may not have received a great tip…but not tipping them at all? That is absurd.

        • susan says:

          Your jaded b/c you work in this industry. If the service was as lousy as she said then they shouldn’t get a tip period. If there was a problem w/the order or a delay a simple “I’m sorry but….(insert whatever problem here)” will go a long way. To completely ignore the table, not bring drinks and screw up a tables order as badly as she spoke of isn’t acceptable in my book. I EARN my money, I expect others to earn theirs as well.

          • jessica says:

            That is not being jaded due to working in the industry. I used to work in the industry, but have not for several years. If a server should get no tip when they provide poor service (which may or may not even be their fault) then people should not get paid for any day that they underperform at their jobs. The reality is that people make mistakes and things go wrong in all jobs, but they still get paid for doing them.

            • Ketsy says:

              I completly agree with ipf’s comment. Unacceptable service means no tip no matter the excuse. A late drink because the bar is busy is one thing but no drink abd mixed up food, I better be gettingomething aken of te check andthe manager coming over. And yes people get paid for their jobs but not tipped. Waitresses tat feelntiled isgust me to begin with. The only thing that will make me tip in a crazy iation is my kids making a mess, thats about it but tats another conversation itself.

            • jessica says:

              what you fail to understand by saying that “yes people get paid for their jobs but not tipped” is that for waitresses’s, the tip is their ONLY pay they actually receive for most of them. It’s not some bonus for five-star service. If your food is mixed up, it’s probably the cook’s fault.

              If you think that no matter the reason, if you aren’t provided with “acceptable” service the waitress gets no tip, how would you feel if, in your own job, you got docked in pay any time a client/customer/whoever did not think you did an acceptable job? Even if it was not your fault but the fault of your coworkers? People would see things a lot differently then :)

        • ipf32680 says:

          It’s not crazy to compare the two industries when making a point of having a bad day is never an excuse for bad service. I know that they are two completely different ends of the spectrum however you are not getting my hard earned money because you had a bad day and I just happen to be on the receiving end of it. Your bad day could be the result of you just paid to get your nails done and now the polish is chipped so now your pissed…does it give you the right to give me crappy service and expect to get a tip? I have had bad days and yes I have taken it out on the customers, and guess what, I got written up and that stays in my file. That is my employer’s way of not giving me a “tip” because that will stay with me for the length of my employment and can be used in determining whether or not I move up in my company. All I am saying is I tip based on the level of service. You don’t provide a service, you don’t get a tip. You provide mediocre service, you get a mediocre tip, usually 15%. You provide a great service, you get a great tip, 25% or more. I am in no way cheap. When I go out, I go out with the mind frame of I am splurging and I want to enjoy myself with no limits. I don’t do it often so when I do, I go all out. But just the same way YOU and anyone else in the service industry work especially hard for your money, I do too and you would NOT appreciate being the customer and getting crappy service because someone had a “bad day” and that goes for any establishment you may frequent not just the ones where tipping is a practice.

          As far as certain things not being the waiter’s fault, I completely understand and agree with that and that is exactly why I stated that I do NOT penalize my waiter for kitchen error, or food coming out slow especially if it’s busy. I know that has nothing to do with the waiter. I only hold the waiter responsible for they part THEY play in my service. I hold everyone accountable for their own actions.

          Just the point of the mixed up food, I know for a fact it was waitress error because there were 8 of us and not once did she write anything down and kept talking to the server in the middle of taking our order. When we spoke to the manager and the waitress was standing there, all she kept saying was “I thought you said you wanted…or didn’t you say you didn’t want…”so this is why again I say I hold people accountable. If she actually gave us her undivided attention when taking our order, even if she didn’t write anything down, I would have been more understanding if our orders were completely wrong and she said it was on the cook’s end…but that was not the case.

          I am by no means a difficult person. I know when waiters are new ( you can tell or they may even tell you) and when this is the case I ALWAYS let the mistakes go, never complain and ALWAYS give a great tip. All I want is service. It doesn’t have to stellar just decent. Ask me if I need steak sauce or ketchup or if I would like a refill, heck ask me if I want dessert before you give me the bill! Are those demands too much? I don’t think they are and that’s ALL I ask for when I go out.

  • Kat Booza says:

    Don’f forget to tip your Dog Groomer!

    • Renee says:

      I’m sorry but if I take my dog to be groomed at Petsmart and get charged $60+, I don’t tip. I took my little dog to another large pet store chain and paid under $40 for the grooming and I DID tip. It’s ridiculous how much they inflate their prices and I don’t want to hear “don’t take your dog to be groomed if you can’t afford to tip” statements.

  • Jennifer says:

    To me
    Poor/fair service or food – 10% tip, no bonus
    Decent to good service – 15% on debit, $2-3 cash extra
    Great service – 20% $5-$10 cash extra

  • Silvia says:

    Please think it this way.I will be the “BAD guy here but this has always been my thought.I come from a country were people don’t depend on tips.It is the owners responsibility to pay the emplyee .. no matter what industry. People pay for the food.It is the job of the waiter or wiatress to serve and they should be paid accordingly( by the establishment).They should not be dependent on the guest for tip. Also it totally up to the guest whether they want to tip or not.
    If there are no one to work for $2.13 or what ever all over the country ,I think there will no other way but to pay them minimum of $8-$12/hour.

    • Ali says:

      I agree with you Silvia.

      • Lisa says:

        I agree with Silvia as well. I do tip and I tip well but I hate feeling like I have to tip because I believe it’s the restaurant’s responsibility to pay their employees the correct wage. We lived in Japan for a few years and there it is considered rude to tip your server. I have to say it was kind of nice not having to tip and we ALWAYS received amazing service.

    • kristospherein says:

      That is your opinion…and based upon the country that you are from. This country runs where servers rely on tips to make anything over minimum wage. If you undertip or fail to tip a server, you are essentially saying they should be making minimum wage. 10 years of experience in the service industry taught me that folks from those countries where tipping is not expected at restaurants generally do not tip very well. It is likely because of this sort of this reluctance to abide by the tipping system established in this country you display in your post.

  • Jordan says:

    TIP! My sister worked her butt off working for her tips and payed her own way through school doing it. However if you barely come to check on me and barely get my food to me and barely refill my drink once, you shouldn’t get anything. I’ve had waitress/waiters give me crappy service and I’ve left them next to nothing. This goes for other things too. Tip if they do a great job, don’t tip much if they don’t. My mother in law doesn’t usually tip when we all go out to dinner. So there is usually 8 of us and my husband and I usually end up being the only ones to tip. It’s beyond rude and that’s what they work for. IF YOU CAN’T TIP DON’T GO OUT TO EAT!!!

    • Ali says:

      I think everyone should tip for good service. But if you can’t tip don’t go out to eat? I don’t really agree with that. There are people who barely make ends meat and want to go to a decent dinner once in a blue moon? They shouldn’t HAVE to tip.

      • Chris says:

        Wow! A person’s refusal to tip robs the server as they are often required to pass on tips to the busser, etc. So, someone who is struggling financially is entitled to a “decent dinner” without tip to the detriment of the person who tips them? I heartily disagree, if you don’t have the money to buy a dinner at a particular restaurant including tax and a reasonable tip, don’t eat there. The percent of the tip should be determined by the service, not by the guest’s sudden feeling of poverty. Why should a server take the brunt of your financial woes?

      • Kb says:

        So you expect a server to wait on them and receive no compensation because they can’t afford it? In doing so they’re making it difficult for a server to pay their bills. Going out to eat is a luxury.

      • Dylan says:

        You are so right. I work really hard, and sometimes I really want to get some new clothes. I don’t want to buy where I can afford at Wal-Mart, so I’m just going to take what I like from Macy’s and they can take the loss. I shouldn’t HAVE to pay more than I can afford, because I want it.

        • kathy says:

          omg so funny!! best way to respond to not having to tip!!

          • Ali says:

            haha, theft and not tipping are two very different things. Tipping is gratuity. Read- optional.

            • Chris says:

              While not tipping is not illegal, it is unethical unless the service was absolutely horrible. We live an extremely frugal lifestyle and have to forego many luxuries (cable, cell phone plans, eating out, etc.), but I am sick of people feeling entitled to something at the expense of others. That waiter/waitress is likely as hard up as the tight wad who thinks they should enjoy a meal on the backs of those that serve him/her.

        • jessica says:

          Ha! Love the analogy! Very true!

      • jessica says:

        This is absurd. Often, the waitresses can barely afford to make ends meet, and their tips are the only pay they ever get. So, they should have to work hard for free? If someone can’t afford to eat out, they need to go to a cheaper restaurant that they can afford, or wait til they can afford that one, or go somewhere that they aren’t waited on, or get their food to go. If I can’t afford to pay my doctor, I don’t go to the doctor, he won’t work for free. If I can’t afford to have a plumber fix a leak in my faucet, he won’t work for free. The contractor won’t fix my deck steps for free if I can’t afford to pay him. Why should a waitress wait on someone for free?? Plus, that person is then taking up a table in that waitress’s section that someone who could afford to tip could have been sitting at. If you can’t afford a service, like with anything else, wait until you can. A waitress who can barely pay her rent or afford to take her kid to the doctor should not have to make additional sacrifices because someone can’t afford to eat out but thinks they deserve to do so.

      • Becky says:

        There are plenty of restaurants they can choose to go to that do not expect tips. Or they can use a coupon to save money so they can afford the tip.

  • Ali says:

    Ok guys, I’m confused. I’m in Oregon and I thought waiters here made our minimum $8 plus tips. Anyone know?

    • Jennifer says:

      I am in Oregon as well and from the chart posted it says that in Oregon servers make $8.95 an hour. I know this is on the low side of salary compared to workers in other industries but when you add in the tips, even poor ones, I think they are fairly well compensated for their work. Tonight I went out to dinner with my family and we tipped $10 on a $75 bill. We were there an hour and she had quite a few other tables as well. Maybe I am wrong but it seems like she was very well compensated for that hour of work for the job she was doing compared to other industries even if some of that money has to be shared with the bussers, cooks, etc.

    • La says:

      Yes, Oregon makes minimum wage. From what I know, there are less than a handful of states (including Washington) where servers make this. Serving is a really stressful, high-pressure job. No, it’s not nearly as important as police work, firefighting, etc., but it is very demanding. I think the biggest toll on the server is having to read that many different people and then accomodate them. It truly is a skill that requires a lot of patience (especially with certain clientele ;). Servers don’t get sick days, if the restaurant paid them a fair wage/minimum wage, then the restaurant would not be able to operate as a sit-down establishment (and even at minimum wage with no tips, you can be sure that any good server will not wait tables any longer) And, yes, if the food does not get served by your server, it is because the restaurant’s priority is getting hot food out while it’s hot. Pay attention and you will see that your server is delivering food to tables that are not his/hers. Sorry, Ali, this isn’t directed at you…lol :)

  • Cindy says:

    I always tip at least 15% at sit-down restaurants (even at buffets, unless it’s completely self-serve, even drinks). If you have an issue with a waiter or waitress, bring it up with the manager, not refusing to tip. If you don’t tip, be prepared to not ever show up in the restaurant again. Chances are, they will remember you and they’ll do something to your food. I’ve never done it myself and neither has my sister who’s worked in the industry but she’s had coworkers who threaten to do so because they’ve had an extremely rude customer or that they refused to tip. Probably unethical and law violating, but really, you never know. Not to mention, if you don’t let the manager know, he or she probably won’t know that there are issues within the restaurant. In conclusion, you are not resolving the issue when you don’t bring it up with the manager. And you don’t have to be belligerent to him or her, just simply state that you had a disappointing experience and just explain why.

    • Cindy says:

      AND, if you don’t tip just because you can’t afford to then you shouldn’t go there to begin with. Stay home and eat, grab takeout or go to a fast food restaurant instead.

      • Judy Blanc says:

        I’m wondering about tipping on take-out. I figure it is like McDs or so if I get take-out from Outback or Applebee’s – but kinda feel like it is way different. Do the kids at the curbside window make reg wage or only the $2.13?

    • kristospherein says:

      Thank you.

  • A Proverbs 31 Wife says:

    So my question is this. I always figure 20% and then round to the nearest dollar when at a restaurant. but on our last trip we did several things, like snorkeling, a daytime cruise and sailing. Then we find out that they are to be tipped. Not only were we totally unprepared to tip the first time. We had no idea what would be considered a good tip.

    So, for services like a guided tour, what is the expected tip price?

  • Steffers says:

    I’m a sever at a high end restaurant in Saratoga, CA…. We are paid $8.25 and hour plus tips and I can say whoever says that no more gratuity should be added if it’s automatic is a load a bull, that is how we make our money! After tipping out the house 6% of my overall sales, not 6% of my tips, any extra is greatly needed. I’m amazed nightly at the stupid people that can’t tip properly even when our receipt states what 15%, 18% and 21% are!!! Then to top it all off sometimes people can’t tip cause they’ve spent too much in dinner, that is not my fault. If you are going to dine then you should plan on dinner, 20% and tax if not stay at home.

    • Heather C. says:

      This is a good example of why I posted what I did earlier on this topic… Why can’t a franchise just pay their employees what they deserve and nix the whole tipping thing??! It would be SO much simpler, and there wouldn’t be the problems caused by people who leave little or no tips.
      Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

      • Jenn says:

        Then you would be crying bc your food would double in price.

        • Samantha says:

          No, not if the price of the food was the same as the tip. If you tip $5 on your meal then why would you mind if your meal went up $5 and you tipped zero?

        • Heather C. says:

          I don’t think nixing the whole tipping thing would result in food prices doubling, that’s a little extreme. And personally, I’d MUCH rather pay a little more for my meal if need be, than have to figure out how much my server deserves for me to PAY him/her for his job. I think that responsibility should be left for his/her employer, not me.
          Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

          • kristospherein says:

            …but that’s not how the system works.

          • La says:

            If the server has no incentive to give you good service, they probably won’t. And your meal will cost more. It’s really not that hard to “figure out” what to tip at a sit-down restaurant.

            • Chris says:

              I agree. Serving is one of those professions where your attitude and work ethic can increase your paycheck immediately. I am happy to help those that truly serve an extra bonus.

  • leslie says:

    I know it sounds silly, but as someone that has spent the last twenty years in the service industry, I always talk about the “Tip Gods”. If I have any opportunity to tip someone, no matter the place, I do so happily. I feel that if I give freely and enthusiastically, it will come back to me. When I go to a restaurant and get excellent service, I praise the service to the manager and tip well. When the service is terrible, I speak to the manager and explain what the server did/how they could have been better. In those cases, I tip the absolute minimum. As a service industry employee, attitude is everything.

  • Laura says:

    I’ve been a waitress before, it is HARD work. And that was when I was in my early 20′s, I swear I don’t think I could do it now I would be exhausted! Anyway I think that every person should have to wait tables for a week and then they can decide how they should tip. If they did that they would realize that 15% is fine and anything more be very grateful that those people either have been servers themselves and know what it’s like or they are very generous. I have had bad service before but usually you can tell that the server just got sat at 5 tables at the same time and no one on their team is helping them. Being a server means that when you are so busy your neighbor server helps you and then vice versa. When you work as a team, as a patron you may be confused with who your server is but you realize that you are being taken care of and that’s what matters. I always tell people that I think everyone should have the experience of at least one week of being a server, what other jobs should be put on that list? I always wonder what everyone should experience at least for a short time to know what it’s like and it would change your whole view of things:) So go ahead, what other jobs do you think everyone should experience sometime in their life….

    • sabrina says:

      I agree that everyone should have to do this for a week and just see what its all about. If you know your going to need something at your table, look around and see what all you would be needing for your meal. I hate when a family will, for example ask for ranch, as soon as I get it to the table someone else decides they need ranch, extra napkins, extra ketchup, and so on, but will only ask for one thing at a time. That one table that cant get it together can throw that server in the weeds and mess up his/ her whole night causing a domino effect on the rest of the tables. If you keep calling me back to your table for this, that and the other its going to cause issues to others.

      I also think others should try a week in:

      Retail: Clean up your mess in the dressing rooms! Its not that hard to put unwanted clothes back on a hanger. Also, don’t get so upset if the sales person tells you they will be right with you. It is usually one person to a deprtment and on a busy day it may take us a moment to finish up with another customer in order to assist you!

      Cashier: be patient! If you give me a $100 dollar bill upon opening of the store I may have to get change!

      Im sure there are many more jobs people need to try out for a week to let them know what its like.

  • Andrea says:

    I do tip but hate it. Build it into the salary and price so i dont have to mess with it or thi nk about it. I believe tipping should be earned and tip according to service. Almost all service is pretty good. I hate seeing tip jars at ice cream parlors or doughnut establishments etc. any thoughts on that? Do you tip someone who dries your car off after a car wash? So many services but who deserves what. It is so confusing. I provided customer service every day and tried to do a great job in an office setting but never received a tip but did not make much. I just don’t understand why some jobs deserve tips for service when others don’t. McDonald’s employes don’t make much moneys. Lots of people make minimum wage but don’t get tips and still provide service.

    • Heather C. says:

      Agreed. :) I worked as a Certified Nursing Assistant at a nursing home while I was in college, and worked my BUTT off everyday to ensure peoples mom’s, dad’s, grandma’s, and grandpa’s were taken care of to the highest standards. It was very hard work, as anyone who’s ever been a CNA is fully aware, and I never even thought about getting a tip. Running to the kitchen to get the residents snacks in the middle of the night, light cleaning if they would request it, and not to mention the “dirty jobs” that a CNA is required to do. (I won’t go into details, as it’s TMI for most.) I was a maid, waitress, AND a caregiver and I got paid a little over a dollar more than minimum wage at the time to do my job. (A job that required me to go through training AND acquire a state license!)

      I wonder why food service, and others companies that expect their employees to receive tips, have to be run differently than any other job… Why do their employees HAVE to rely on tips??? I know it’s just how it is in this country, but who ever came up with the idea must have enjoyed making things more complicated than they have to be! :)
      Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

      • MommySpendsLess says:

        most restaurants have “rushes” around the prime eating times but not many employees would come in for a 2-3 hour shift. having a low hourly pay rate allows the restaurant to staff up enough to cover the busy time without sending their overhead costs through the roof. tipping also aligns the interests of the employees with that of the customer and thus the restaurant. so in addition to significantly higher payroll for wait staff, they would have higher management costs if they replaced the tipping system. they would likely have to raise prices by much more than 15-20% to cover the increased costs. so would you prefer $ 10 $2=$12 or to pay $15 $0=$15 for your meal? ( typed… badly… on my phone, sorry)

        • Heather C. says:

          $12 any day! Lol! ;)

          I’m curious exactly how much more a meal would cost at any given restaurant if there was no such thing as “tipping”… I wonder if any establishment has figured that out…?
          Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

          • Rainy says:

            Well, if you consider that the restaurant would have to pay their employee at least $7.25/hr instead of $2.13, that is $5.12 just for 1 server for one hour. Then you have to figure how many employees they have working at a time. Considering I wouldn’t think anyone would want to go in to work just the “rush hours” (11:00-1:00, 6:00-8:00), they would have to pay these employees to come in for the entire night. So let’s say they need 4 servers on for morning & 8 for night(10:00am-11:00pm). The pay difference would be $493 @7.25/hr & $144.84 @2.13/hr. That’s a difference of $348.16 a day. I would guess the price of dinner would go up about 10-15%.

  • Angie says:

    I always look for some one not expecting a tip and tip them. An example there was a girl sweeping the floor at the hotel I was staying at. I gave her $5. People usually tip waiters, cleaners,…people that serve u. But prob no one really go out of their way to tip a random person trimming the bushes, mopping the hallway, …

  • diana says:

    Ok – in WA state even Arbys or McDonalds staff get min wage which is nearly $10 an hour – that is why some restaurants are not here – they can’t afford the high wages with cheap menu prices

  • Aimee says:

    Tipping is a well established practice in the restaurant industry. To say, “Sue your Boss” if you don’t meet the minimum wage is ridiculous. What person making minimum wage has the financial resources to do that? To try and compare professionals such as doctors and teachers to waiters is insane. Professionals get benefit packages, waiters do not. It’s easy to say that the owners should make up the difference, but that will probably never happen. They don’t even want to give their employees any benefits. The bottom line is, if you have a problem with tipping in a restaurant, please do the right thing and order take out or eat at Noodles and Company. They don’t allow tipping which their poor employees have to state every time they bring you your food.

    • cindi says:

      I think you’re missing the point. Its the law to make up minimum wage if tips don’t. If you work for a large corporation then they know this. If you’re working for a family owned business who doesn’t follow fair labor laws then quit!!! You don’t have to Sue to stop being wronged. I doubt thatsbwhats happening though.

  • kath says:

    I tip at our local del taco because my 2 mentally disabled sons love taco Tuesday so that is our weekly ritual but they leave a huge mess every time. I can’t clean it up because I am just me against them and have to make sure they don’t mess with anyone else or anyone elses food. Once I just went and picked up food while my kids were with a sitter and the manager said where are the kids? She said they are so cute. Anyways I feel they deserve a tip for cleaning up after my kids. Just my opinion.

    • Ketsy says:

      Yay! Just went to spend time with friends at Miami and they tip well an according to their salaries. I tipped on top of that plus let the cashier cash out the remainder of my gift card and my friend asked why… Im like look under the table and you will see lol

  • Ali says:

    Honestly I tip well, and I think everyone should depending on service. But people keep saying that waiters work so hard and their jobs are so hard, yeah, most jobs are. I worked in an Alzheimers facility and that was hard. No benefits, no tips, just working your butt off to help other peoples loved ones.

    • jessica says:

      People keep acting like a tip is a bonus the waitress gets for great service. But in reality the tip IS the waitress’s pay. Yes, people work hard at other jobs, and they get paid to do them. If the waitress does not get a tip, then they worked hard and did not get paid at all for that. It can’t be compared to other jobs where people work hard and don’t get a tip, because people get a salary or hourly pay to do those jobs.

  • Pamela says:

    So, how much would you tip the lady who waxes your legs? I couldn’t find that… I’ve always been scared of being too cheap or giving too much… This new place I found, is good and the person who does my legs is also the owner… So, if the legs service is 65, how much would you suggest to tip? TIA :D

    • vicki says:

      I always figure 15% for anything I don’t know what to tip…especially if its the service you had to make an appt for like your hair or a massage.

      However, since its the owner, not sure that holds true.

      and now my real thought: $65 for someone to inflict that pain! yikes!

      • Pamela says:

        Yep… Plus, if you get a brazilina, it’s 45… Double ouch! Lol… So, I guess I wasn’t tipping that bad… Problem is that I don’t know if it’s right to tip the owner because, either way, she’s also getting the earnings from the service… Not to be cheap, but would like to know what’s right, you know ;)

  • Serena says:

    I looked at the tip website and it basically says to tip everyone 20%, unless you are the shampoo person in which case you get $2.
    It didn’t answer any of the tipping questions that I had.
    For example:
    1) If your “friend” talks you into getting a haircut from her relative and arranges for you to get your haircut at her house on her day off. This “relative” charges you the full rate she would have charged you at the salon, do you have to tip 20% on top of that? She would not have gotten the full rate if she had cut your hair at the salon. She does an ok job cutting your hair, you can’t really tell as she only has 2 small mirrors.

    2) How much do you tip your tour guide? Is it a flat rate per person or is it based on the amount of the tour? In some places I could pay $50 for a full day tour and in other places $120 for the same amount of time.

    3) I tip my regular hairdresser 20% and I have been seeing her for 2 years. She spends 1 hour with me washing, cutting, and drying my hair. Now she has decided to hire a shampoo person AND she is stacking her appointments every 30 minutes. She no longer has enough time to fully dry my hair. Do I tip the shampoo person $2 (according to the website) PLUS 20% for her? Or can I take the $2 out of her 20%? Or should I just go and find someone else to cut my hair?

    • Lisa says:

      How wonderful that you tip her 20%. If she does a great job for you the why go somewhere else? She is most likely “tipping out” the shampoo girl. If you feel you are not getting 100 percent of her attention then reduce the tip, but if you like her and the cut don’t go somewhere else. Maybe talk with her and let her know how you feel. It is a relationship you have and I would appreciate if my client relayed her concern to me. The cut is the most important thing, I believe. But you need to do what is in your heart. If you were my client I would want to know. This economy isn’t great and she is making her time count by cutting more and washing and drying less. I understand where you are coming from though.

    • Lisa says:

      oh and if you are going to someone’s house to get a cut, then no, don’t tip 20 percent because there is no overhead, in fact the price of the haircut should be much less. hth

    • vicki says:

      i agree with the previous poster…no tip at her house. however, i’m pretty sure she also legally cant charge you a certain amount when not in a licensed salon (my mom was a hairdresser for years and that used to be the rule anyway).

      as for the shampoo girl question, i’d definitley take the $2 out of the other tip. you shouldn’t be tipping PER person if the actual amount of services you’re recieving hasnt changed.

  • Lauren says:

    people that say restaurants need to pay there servers better and do not tip because of this need to get over it. The service industry will never change, and it is not our fault that we get paid in tips. That is the way the restaurant industry has made it. I am very good at my job, and still have days where I make horrible tips. Too many people think that we make more than the $2.13/ hour that we never see. Also, where I work (whether you tip us or not) we have to tip out the bartender and bussers a % of our sales. So if you stiff me, I lose money on serving you. If there is bad service, by all means please get a manager involved and adjust down your tip. Don’t however, purposely look for reasons to justify tipping badly so you feel better. I understand you work hard for your money, but please take tipping into account when you go out to eat. That is the money that we work hard for.

    • Heather C. says:

      I definitely think an establishment should somehow educate it’s customers that employees don’t even make minimum wage! There are so many people that don’t know a tip is part of your pay. Although “that’s just the way it is” in this country, It’s still not fair that you and others work so hard for so little pay.
      Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

  • Lisa says:

    Don’t tip the owner? That’s horrible. I own my own salon and my haircut prices are the same as my staff. I don’t have “owner’s” prices. All of my clients tip me and tip me well because I take such wonderful care of them. Totally don’t agree with this guideline. Owners have a lot of overhead and need and appreciate tips as well. Tips are our living sometimes. I so appreciate my clients, they are Cheerful givers.

  • Marlena says:

    Where I come from ( Europe) waiters do my expet us to tip . Owners pay the waiters, bar tenders, etc the minimum wage to work there . If they receive a tip that’s great bit they don’t expect to get it . Are the meals much more expensive ? No . They cost te same if not less .
    I’m so not used to tipping, I would like to go ti restaurants more but I can’t afford to have an extra $5 on top of my bill .
    My husband waited tables for a while so we know how it is. Some people tip really good while others tip whatever they can afford !

    • kristospherein says:

      Don’t go out to eat if you cannot afford to tip. In many places the servers walk out with only whatever they receive in tips. On slow nights, that means the server is literally making minimum wage…the job (for most servers) is not equivalent to working in a fast food joint.

      • susan says:

        Don’t get me wrong here but your point is not valid in my opinion. What’s wrong with making minimum wage? If cna’s, custodians, cashiers and the likes can do their job and still only earn minimum I am sure waiting staff can as well. I understand less than minimum but when you complain about only making minimum wage, something is wrong with this picture.

        • jessica says:

          I think most people would complain about making only minimum wage when they feel their skill set and hard work is typically above the standards for a minimum wage job. Where I live, CNAs and janitors get paid above minimum wage. I have worked as both a waitress and a cashier, and being a waitress is a MUCH more demanding and difficult job. Same with comparing it to fast food. Waitress should make more than someone working at McDonalds because what is necessary to gain employment as a waitress, and to keep the job and perform well at it, is typically above and beyond what is expected of an entry-level mcdonald’s employee, and therefore, as with any job, they should be paid accordingly.

    • Chris says:

      My in-laws just spent a month in Europe and heartily disagree that the meals do not cost more. The meals were very expensive. Sitting in a coffee shop to drink a coffee drink would cost as much as $12. Perhaps where you originate the cost of food was not pricey, but in their experience in Germany, France, Belgium, and Austria, eating out required a huge hunk of change. I’ll take a less expensive meal and tip generously any day… Additionally, determining a tip is not difficult, just calculate 1/5 of your bill (this is elementary math) or 2 times 10%. Or, figure out the tip based on the tax (in many counties in CA it is around 10%, so simply double the tax). Many people have calculators or apps on their phones. The difficulty of determining a tip is a cop out as you should have garnered these skills in elementary school.

  • SOFATCHICK says:

    Do you guys tip when you go to the hair salon?

  • jessica says:

    Honestly, reading a lot of these comments is depressing, and makes me so happy I am no longer a waitress. I waitressed for five years when I was younger, and currently I am a salaried employee making a good paycheck and working a demanding job 60 hours a week and I can tell you that the waitressing was harder than my current professional job.

    What everyone fails to see, by saying they work hard, firefighters work hard, teachers work hard, and they all don’t get tips, is that the tips ARE the salary of these people. As others have mentioned, waitresses normally don’t get ANY paycheck other than tips. If I’m doing my job and someone doesn’t think I did a good job, or I went to pee for 1 minute and my secretary had to answer a question for me, or I can’t do the impossible for a person, or I’m not 1000% cheery every second of the day, no one takes away part of my pay. If I got paid on every single interaction I had with each client based on what that client thought I deserved, how much that client could afford, and whether that client wanted to pay me that, I wouldn’t make what I do. Imagine if teachers did not receive part of their salary for each student who was not on grade level? Imagine if doctors only got paid when patients were happy with their service? If firefighters got a doc in pay each time they could not save the house? Of course, everyone thinks those things are unrealistic because we realize those things are out of their control. Just like much of these complaints are beyond the control of the waitresses.

    If you can’t afford to tip, I don’t care if it’s only twice a year you get to eat out, you cannot afford to eat out, and you do not DESERVE to have someone work for you for free, under the assumption that they will get a tip. Save the extra few dollars, or go somewhere cheaper, or get takeout. Would you stay late to your job and work for free because a client could not afford to pay you? No. What if you didn’t know you weren’t getting paid, worked your butt off, then found out you were getting paid diddly squat for the hard work you did, because that other person claimed they could not afford it?

    If your waitress did not check on your table multiple times, someone else brought out your food, or God forbid you had to develop enough social skills to ask a nearby table to use their ketchup…that does not mean your waitress was out back propping her feet up and reading the paper. Often that means that they restaurant was not planning for such a big crowd that day so the waitress is working extra tables, someone called in sick, a cook may be on break and she may be making her own salads, in some restaurants waitresses make up the desserts, she may be adding a bill for another table, or getting food together in the back for a table. Just because she isn’t in view doesn’t mean she isn’t doing anything. Also, some of you who say that one person took your order then you didn’t see them again and someone else brought your food and check, etc….well, waitresses do have an end of shift, and the staff switches. It is common practice in many restaurants for one to take your order and then if the shift is switching, someone else will finish your order. No one wants to wait around for one table and possibly a $5 tip for an hour or two for you to finish your meal. Your tip will go to whoever did the majority of the work, or will be split.

    Another thing: Often, whatever you are complaining about is beyond the waitresses control. I’ve been there. The order got messed up? Oh, one of the cooks didn’t read the slip right. Meat not cooked to your liking? The new cook was rushed. The waitress didn’t refill your water when it ran out? That’s often the hostess’s job. The waitress didn’t bring your meal to you? That was the expediter’s job. That’s what he gets paid for, and the waitress has no control over whether he brings it to you. You didn’t get your bill fast enough, or your waitress didn’t check on you enough? The waitress can’t control that they are short a waitress that day, or that there is more of a rush at that hour than the owner’s expected. Don’t take those things out on the server!

    Another thing to keep in mind is that when you fail to tip someone, they are still taxed and have to “tip out” to bartenders, bussers, etc. on your order. So they still have to pay as if you have tipped them. Therefore, if you haven’t tipped they are paying for these services on your order for you, and they have no control over this. This is effectively stealing from them.

    When you go out to eat and leave no tip, you are getting someone to work for you for free, under the implied social contract that they will be reimbursed for their service. You are completely taking advantage of someone’s time and energy. Getting “stiffed” generally results in a bad day for that person. The waitress will often wonder what they did wrong and feel upset for trying hard and doing all that work for nothing. So I say again, if you can’t afford to tip, or if you think someone should work for you for free and you should only tip if their work is “exceptional,” then you have no business eating at an establishment in which tipping is common practice.

    It is great people want to save money. But please, do not take advantage of others in order to do so.

    • kristospherein says:

      Agreed. I am extremely happy I moved on. People have so little respect for what servers do.

    • MommySpendsLess says:

      Well said! :)

    • M says:

      Thank you so much for this!!! =)

    • sabrina says:

      Very well said! Thank You for this!

    • susan says:

      While I agree being a waitress is a very hard job your comments did make me wonder what it is they do if “the cook makes the food”, “the hostess refills your water” and “the expediter brings the food”. O.o

      • jessica says:

        Ok, to give you an idea. Generally I worked an 8 hour day plus 15 minutes to get there before shift (unpaid) in order to transition over orders/tables in process, and an hour after shift for cleaning (for which I got paid the whopping $2.13 and no tips). In the course of that 9 hours and 15 minutes, I did the following: greeted customers upon entering; seated them and gave menus and waters (when the one hostess was cashing someone out, with another table, filling waters, etc); took drink orders and remembered who ordered what; got drinks myself and delivered them; reviewed daily specials with each table; kept up-to-date with what we were out of in the kitchen; learned a laundry list of all the items on our menu, side options, dressings and so forth; took orders; provided food recommendations and information for guests with questions or who were indecisive; heated up bread for tables; made up salads when the cooks got too busy to get them out on time to my tables (some waitresses always have to do this); restacked bread dishes, butter dishes, glasses, dessert dishes from the dishwasher area when we were low, etc; stocked condiments; got all sides on a tray and delivered to table; remembered who ordered which meal and which side went with which meal, along with all the individual specifications (extra dressing? No ice? Gravy on the side?); when my order was ready and I heard my number called, used my order slip to stack my tray with everything I needed for my order, including things I had to get or make myself; brought food to my own tables (unless I was busy with another task and the expeditor stepped in); took the flack from angry customers who had an order messed up through no fault of my own and had to apologize profusely for mistakes that were not mine; asked customers if they had everything or needed napkins, condiments, etc; checked in multiple times while guests dined; remembered all the 359 things the table wanted more of; refilled waters, sodas, alcoholic beverages; made my own alcoholic beverages at the bar when the bartender was not on staff or when busy; cleared tables to make room for other guests when we were busy; cleared dishes off the tables as my guests finished them so as not to be in the way; offered desserts and coffee; made coffee; made up desserts such as milkshakes made by hand, brownie sundaes and the like that I had to make by hand; constantly kept in contact with manager and other waitresses (my table 3 needs more ketchup? Another waitress gave table 4 an extra side of fries I need to add to the bill? Ok, keep that all in memory); calculated separate checks for each person who wanted them; ran credit cards and cashed out guests; cleaned counters/bathrooms/restocked supplies, etc; set table for next guests. Where I worked I sometimes translated the menu into another language, and had to calculate the Canadian exchange rates (don’t ask me why we didn’t have a computer system to do that). In downtime, we made up sets of silverware, ran to the bank to get change, deep-cleaned much of the restaurant, including scrubbing toilets each night (we were responsible for ALL the cleaning, we did not have a janitor), and we did things like made pies and peel potatoes and help make up sides/chopped veggies, etc. All of this and more that I know I can’t remember because it’s been years. And I did not get a lunch break or bathroom break like most jobs get. I was on my feet for all 9 hours and was not allowed to ever sit for even a second. Only time I could sit was on the toilet, and even then had to be arranged with someone to cover my tables for me, and had to be at the non busy times. I did not get to eat during my shift or take a break to rest. And I had to do all of this with a smile on my face, even when the last table yelled at me for something that was not my fault. Always with an “of course” attitude and calm demeanor. It was completely normal for us to walk quickly to the kitchen door and then people behind that door were running around like chickens with their heads cut off. People just do not realize how things function in the back of busy restaurants. Customers are allowed to have bad days and take it out on wait staff, but wait staff can’t have bad days. Wait staff is frequently the target for entitled, difficult, unhappy people to take their unrealistic standards out on. So, for anyone who thinks it might be easy, please go work at a busy diner for 5 days in a row. I do not think most people could do it for a single day.

  • Kassi says:

    I had no idea thats how it worked for waiters. I will probably tip more now that I know.

  • Brenda says:

    Here’s a tip–beware of tipping in jars on the counters of some establishments. The tips do not always go where you think. My son spent 6 months working at a restaurant with one of these “tip jars” on the counter, and EVERY CENT went into the owners’ pockets. They never gave any tip money to the employees. This was a restaurant where customers order at the counter and seat themselves. Customers seeing “tip jar” automatically believe that the employees will receive that money but it’s not necessarily the case. I’m sure in many places the employees do split the tips, but ASK before you drop money in that jar.

  • Kb says:

    If a family of 4 goes out to eat and the tab is $40 and they tip 20% that’s an $8 tip (assuming the server doesnt tip out) That could feed the servers family for an entire day. Is it more important that your family eats out (a luxury) than the servers family eat for a whole day just because you don’t feel you need to tip? It’s sad to hear some people feel like they don’t need to tip on service they’ve received.

  • Tonya says:

    I like hearing about some of these less known situations and how much to tip and when. But anything in Food and Beverage, where you are dealing with a server or bartender, you need to tip. Its part of our job to make tips and we arent the ones that made the weird standards. Sometimes we come out way ahead and sometimes we cant even afford the gas it took to get to work. Either way if you want to dine out at a bar or restaurant than be prepared to tip and to tip properly. If that isnt ok with you then please stay home.

  • Christy P. says:

    I first have to say, I hate the “Don’t tip the owner” rule….I am an owner of a Dog grooming shop, I will get the people who say to me “and I don’t have to tip you because you are the owner” I will look around and ask “why”…and they reply because you get ALL the money….really, I guess that is why I am a business owner and you work for corporate america….I have NO employees so how do I pay my rent, my phone bill to make your appt., the shampoo to wash your dog, the electricity that powers the dryer to dry your dog….Me…… and with your money I can pay all of my overhead, so tell me how I get ALL the money? Why as an owner who provides the same service vs. an employee any different? I provided you with GREAT service because with me being the “owner” I take more pride in how I take care of your animal than an “employee” probably would, it is not just a J.O.B. for me….and so IF you are not going to tip don’t go out of your way to be rude about it, I know everybody has different financial issues, I don’t judge you. This topic is always a sore subject for me, sorry.

    • Maria says:

      thank you!!!!

      • carrie says:

        I would never think of not offering the owner a tip–whether a groomer or a hairtylist. If he or she declines it, then next time I’d bring a coffee or fancy cupcake or something.

    • Judy Blanc says:

      If you feel you need extra to pay your bills, raise your prices a little. I bet most people choose you because of your location so your clients shouldn’t move and your income will go up.

  • Allison says:

    I think about tipping as a sort of “Table Rental” (and with kids a “Damage Deposit”) Because I’m sucking up a space that could be used by another eater. Trust me, it absolutely THRILLS the staff to get a five dollar tip on a ginger-ale and crackers and air-conditioning (morning sick).

    And I ALWAYS tip double if the staff is really nice both “to” and “about” the kids. Which if you go to the same restaurent again will inspire staff to lunge in-front of others to snag you out of the waiting line. And you might get TWO cherries in your cherry-Sprite, starting a cycle of excessive happiness for everyone involved.

    • La says:

      Haha….all very true.

    • ange says:

      Yes! If my family lingers I always factor in extra for the money lost by not flipping the table quickly and if the server brings bread or veggies for my kids to snack on while we wait for food thats probably the easiest money they could make because I get uber generous when they help keep the kids happy.

      • Chris says:

        I thoroughly agree with both of you. Children often require more attention, clean-up, and time. We tip better when our children make a mess or we take our time at the table (taking up the space of new tippers).

  • shannon says:

    I always tip on the full amount if I use a coupon. I always leave a tip even if the service is bad. I will tip less than I would if the service was great. I tip based on the quality of service.

  • MaeAnn says:

    Lol. I always tip when i go to a restaurant though.. but i think they always receive the minimum wage. &ohMG! is this really true? Who would love to work if they only get paid 2.13/hr? Just sayin..

    • Ketsy says:

      No, when this happens the company is supposed to cover the rest up to minimum wage. It s jut frowned upon and usually they get ino tense onversations if not fired for underperforming. It works like meeting sales or making commission. Waiters just complain because they feel they need to get paid the minimum plus all tips over that which is not the case when they have to cover up to theminimum and then the rest is tips..

  • Maria says:

    I don’t like the “don’t tip the owner” bit. My family owns a restaurant and I wait tables and run the register/pack orders in the back when I’m at home (I’m a college student). Sometimes people don’t tip me because they believe I’m “an owner” (which I am, but not really. It’s my parent’s business). I pay for myself in college. My parents’ revenue goes towards family bills (utilities, mortgage, other stuff that parents pay for – i’m not a parent but i’m sure parents understand!). It’s really annoying to do so much work for a customer and not get tipped just cause I’m “an owner.” Yes, I am an owner, but I am paying my way through college. I pay both my tuition and my save up my own spending money so I can buy myself some new clothes every once in a while. Just a little food for thought, I guess. Yes, the owners are making a lot of money from their restaurant (or whatever establishment it might be), but even owners have other expenses. Maybe they have a big family and are just getting by. Maybe they own a business, but are still in school for another reason. I don’t think it’s fair to just say “don’t tip the owner.” Moreover, if they provide you good service, why not reward them? Just saying.

    • Chris says:

      I agree with you. If you serve in the same capacity of the other wait staff, you should be treated with the same generosity. I’m assuming the “don’t tip the owner” rule has more to do with leaving an extra tip at the counter, in addition to the server’s tip…

  • Katie says:

    I am not sure about tipping at places like Cafe Rio. You stand to order, move through the line as they prepare your food, carry your food to the table, and dump your own tray. There is a line on the receipt to tip. Is this optional or does everybody tip?

  • Griff says:

    That’s one of the reasons I loved Japan. Every server we encountered gave what would be considered 5 star service in the US and no tip was expected.

    I understand that we, as US consumers have been trained that a tip is expected or we are hurting the server economically because their employer compensation isn’t fair (how did THIS ever come to be – and why must the customer have to make up the difference?)

    I’ve heard its assumed in the industry that women are the worst tippers. I leave 20% not including alcohol/tax. If I receive service close to what I experienced in Japan, I’ll leave a few dollars above 20%.

    I worked as a server (I was paid minimum wage + tips) and as a retail worker. I think it should be mandatory for at least a year out of HS to be in a service position.

    I find that service in my area is pitiful. But that is just the state of US society – no one takes pride in their job – just get it done so you can text and get back on Facebook.

    • Heather C. says:

      Love your last paragraph! SOOOO TRUE!
      Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

    • Allison says:

      I’ve heard that about women too. Although once I was at dinner with a friend who announced to the waiter something along the lines of “I’ve had a really bad day and I’m tired and hot and cranky and I suspect that you think we won’t be tipping well because its a weekday and we’re two women BUT all I want is a big glass of tea and I’ll tip HUGE if I don’t see the bottom of the glass.” I had nachos and tea, she just had tea. Neither of us saw the bottom of the glass. In fact, every waiter in the place tried to top off her glass as soon as she took a sip. Finally, she doubled over laughing when two waiters made a dash for our booth from opposite directions. It was a $20 tip, and worth every penny.

  • Ketsy says:

    Tipoing is always a controversial issue. Those in that job complain about it but then they have the job for a reason. Its a hard job that I wouldnt do but some jobs at the hospital seem worst to me… Dealing with your families blood and feces, plus life threateningetc. Just saying! I tip if and when deserved. Here lately I tip a bit more out of guilt because my kids are messy and also depending on how long I was there because I consider taking up the table when others couldve been sitting there. However, I do agree also that no tip at all for ridiculously poor service is also adequate. The same way as I tip my favorite Starbucks person for just pouring a cup of coffee or pizza guy when I pick up. I consider my one dollar or two on the tip jar covers the gas for them to drive to work at least. Anyhow, I have cousins that are superb waitresses and do this for a a living and have to listen to their stories. There are those restaurants who make them split their tips with others and ere are also waitresses that pocket and hide cash tips not to report to employer and not to pay taxes… So fingerpointing goes that way too and not just to costumers.

  • cindy cramer says:

    Thanks for printing guide.I’m normally a good tipper but I’ve run across a situation that makes me wonder.I’ve got a new drycleaner and they have a tip jar on the counter.I’ve never heard of this before and am wondering what to tip.Please help.

  • ange says:

    I am always lost on tipping at the salon/barber. I usually give $5 (on a $25-30 cut) at the salon for my cuts, but for the hubby and kids the cuts are much cheaper so do I tip the same or less?

  • Anonymous says:

    I bus tables at minimum wage.. Yeah it’s kinda sad when I make $25 a night and one waitress gets a $20 tip for one table lol

  • cshepeck says:

    Taxes are taxes; you have to pay them no matter where you work, this shouldn’t be a topic of discussion! And if waiting tables is such an awful profession educate yourself and find a different job, no one is forcing you to stay in the service profession.

  • carrie says:

    Dining out, decent service gets 20% of the total bill before discounts after tax, rounded up to the nearest $5 increment. Excellent service gets more.
    There are a few lunch places I regularly go that don’t have table service (they are Panera- or Chipotle-style dining) and I will normally through a dollar in the tip jar when I have cash.
    I do tip the dog groomer, usually a few extra bucks for the dogs’ nail trims which is all they get.
    I tip my hairstylist at least 20%. I only get haircuts, but he spends an hour with me and I only get my hair trimmed 4-6 times/year.
    If I have cash, I tip in cash because I was told that is usually preferred over credit card tipping.

  • txhrc4 says:

    I ALWAYS tip when I use a Groupon and I tip at the full price, not the discounted price. Sometimes I add a bit more as a little surprise. My mother was a waitress and worked her butt off, I am a firm believer in tipping good even when the server is having a bad day.

  • Ariana says:

    Wow, what a heated discussion! What I`d like to know is how much (per hour) waiters get WITH tips. Because the waiter I used to know could afford way more things that I could. Also (even though I DO tip!!!) I struggle with the idea of tipping for everything. like going to have your hair cut, pay $60 for it and then have to tip some 20%. Why?! Didn`t I just pay enough? Before you get upset with me, I`ll repeat that I do tip, but it doesn`t mean I like doing it all the time.

    • Ketsy says:

      Between this and babysitting, its always an issue. They like to get paid well no matter their service and I question if they themselves tip well or pay well for babysitting or do they use the excuse Im a waiter to pay less… Tis tis. What I can tell you is that on good night they make well over minimum wage, but thats why ey are upset. Its not that they make $2.13 is that they have to cover the remainder up to minimum before getting paid more and also tip the bartender, busers, etc. So on slow nights lets say minimum, but karaoke, bar nights they are making money… If not, they wouldnt be doing it.
      Tipping is just thw way e service industry is made here and whether we like it or not its there. I personally feel like they should just adjust pricings accordinly but oh well. It is what it is. My way of feeling beter about it is expecting nothing but the best. If my hairdresser is done and I see an uneven cut or a not so well ironed poece of her, I let her know and she has to fix it before I get off the chair. Theres the tip. For restaurants, a coupon will help me on that tip bill so not really a discount but works. Places like starbucks, etc. It depends on my mood and whether I walked out, sat there for awhile taking someone elses place or brought the kids with me.

    • Chris says:

      It depends on where you serve. I doubt your average chain store or family owned restaurant employee makes much, but high end restaurants can make for a very lucrative career. I worked at Disneyland and learned that Company D (exclusive club in the park) wait staff could make multiple thousands per week. But, you didn’t get into the Company D service without a great deal of experience and exceptional skills.

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