How to Freeze Soup In Mason Jars for EASY Make Ahead Meals

How to Freeze Soup In Mason Jars

Directions

1

Prepare and cook your soup as normal. Allow time for the soup to completely cool.

2

Transfer the soup with a ladle into mason jars without overfilling them so the jars don't break once the frozen soup starts to expand. Loosely put the lid on. Let freeze, and then tighten the lids the following day.

3

To defrost, place jars into the fridge overnight or on the counter. Submerge the jars in lukewarm water (don't microwave). If ingredients separate after thawing, shake the jar or mix in the blender. Reheat in a pot or microwave as normal. Enjoy!

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Try these tips on how to freeze soup in mason jars!

placing mason jar with soup into freezer

Need a make-ahead meal idea?

How about making and freezing soups in mason jars to reheat as needed for healthy and homemade meals this winter?! There’s nothing more comforting than a warm bowl of soup and I’ll show you how to freeze soup in mason jars as a great way to prep individual meals.

chicken, vegetables, and dutch oven on countertop

For this project, I turned leftover rotisserie chicken into a pot of delicious Chicken Lemon Orzo Soup, let it cool, and then transferred it to pint-sized wide-mouth mason jars to reheat in the future!

Ideas like this can be a lifesaver when you want a homemade meal and have no time to cook. It would also make a thoughtful gift for a new mom or sick friend if they have the freezer space!

ladle with chicken orzo soup

Tips for freezing soup/broth in mason jars:

  • Let soup cool down before transferring to glass. This will avoid shocking jars and breakage.
  • Wide mouth-style jars are preferred when freezing soup because they are easier to fill and less likely to break with expansion.
  • Do not overfill jars. Leave 1-2 inches room for headspace so you’ll have room for expansion.
  • Don’t have a mason jar? You can freeze the soup in Ziplock bags and lay them down until frozen, then arrange them in an upright position like filing folders. Brilliant!
  • Consider loosely placing lids on initially for freezing, then coming back to tighten the next day.
  • Try not to store jars touching each other. There are several ways to do this which include – using the cardboard box the jars come with, using a jar box protector, or even slipping jars into clean socks!
  • Frozen jars of soup can stay fresh for 3-4 months in the freezer.

mason jars with soup ingredients

soup ingredients

pouring broth

cooled down soup

pouring soup into jars

pouring soup into jars


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How to Freeze Soup In Mason Jars

Freezing soup in mason jars is an easy and simple way to prepare your meals ahead.

Directions

1

Prepare and cook your soup as normal. Allow time for the soup to completely cool.

2

Transfer the soup with a ladle into mason jars without overfilling them so the jars don't break once the frozen soup starts to expand. Loosely put the lid on. Let freeze, and then tighten the lids the following day.

3

To defrost, place jars into the fridge overnight or on the counter. Submerge the jars in lukewarm water (don't microwave). If ingredients separate after thawing, shake the jar or mix in the blender. Reheat in a pot or microwave as normal. Enjoy!

Brought to you by Hip2Save.

making soup to freeze

How do I defrost my soup?

The ideal way to defrost frozen jars is to move them to your refrigerator overnight, or on the counter, if you are able to monitor them. To speed up the process, try submerging in lukewarm water. Microwaving a frozen glass jar is NOT recommended. Always frost first.

If they separate after thawing, try giving the soup a shake in the jar or a whirl in the blender to mix.

mason jars in freezer

What types of soup freeze well?

You can freeze most soups, but keep in mind that sometimes cream-based varieties with potatoes and/or fresh veggies can have a different consistency when reheated. It can be as easy as whipping them up again after re-heating to fix it, however.

For this reason, broth-based soups and ones that have beans are great for freezing and reheating. For soups that have pasta, consider under-cooking noodles a little if making specifically to freeze so they have a nice texture when re-heated.

bean and ham soup

Need some delicious soup ideas? Check out these popular Hip2Save soup recipes that are freezer-friendly:


Here are even more soup recipes!


Lina has a Bachelor's Degree from Northern Arizona University with 10 years of blogging and photography experience having work featured in Today.com, Martha Stewart, Country Living, Fox News, Buzzfeed, and HGTV.


Join The Discussion

Comments 39

  1. emily97

    These is such a great idea! Thanks for sharing. 🙂

  2. LeeLee

    Thank you for your wonderful ideas! 👍

    • Lina D

      Thanks LeeLee!

  3. Molly Mi

    Once the jar had been in the refrig and defrosted, is it okay to heat up in the microwave then? I would want to put the frozen soup in the refrig the night before and then take to work and heat up in the microwave there.

    • Lina D

      Yes! Works great 👍

  4. Marie Rodriguez

    Please do not use just any mason jar. They must be freezer mason jars or they will break in the freezer.

  5. Mommyof5

    Great Idea! Thank you for sharing.

  6. Wendy Magrath

    I use freezer strength zip lock bags, lay them flat and stack in freezer. I have had jars break on me. Either way I do freeze soup and it is great.

    • Lina D

      Oh great idea! Thanks for sharing 👍

    • Samantha

      I do the same thing!

  7. Val

    Thanks for sharing. These look wonderful. Anyone have tips for broth. I’m never sure what to save to make my own. Also reluctant to buy can broth because it is usually high in sodium also not sure I would care for flavor.

    • jen s.

      If you cook a whole chicken in a crockpot, that will give you a lot of broth. I’m also in the same boat, I look for low sodium everything! Love the sodium free packets to make chicken broth for recipes!

    • anna

      If you buy dark meat chicken like drumsticks or thighs. Cook it in Instant Pot just long enough to get the meat done. Then turn it off and separate the meat from the bones. Then put the broth back in with bones and maybe 1 onion, 2 celery sticks, 2 cloves of garlic and pressure cook again for like 40mins- 1 hour. The broth should be ready then. You will get the goodness of the bone marrow plus the cartilage AND your chicken meat won’t be all mush from being cooked with the bones too long. That’s the main benefit of doing this in 2 steps.

      • Lina D

        Thanks for the helpful tips!

    • Mel R.

      What I do is save all the chicken bones (the whole chicken or breast/leg/thighs from roasting), even if it still has some meat & skin on. I put the bones in a gallon size freezer baggie and label it ‘soup stock’. I also add along the way – tops/bottoms and the skins on the onions, celery & carrot tops. The onion skin will give your broth a nice brown color! When my bag gets full, then I dump it all in the crockpot with 6-8 C water, along with a few stems of fresh thyme & parsley, about 4 smashed garlic cloves, 1 TBSP apple cider vinegar & Salt & Pepper. Cook on low for 8-10 hrs. Once the broth is cool enough to handle, discard all the bones and strain well to get all the other weird bits and pieces out. I then freeze in 1 C units (either freezer containers or you can lay the ziploc bags flat on a cookie sheet so they freeze in a solid sheet, then you can stack them. Be sure to label with a sharpie first!)
      Or, if you have a pressure cooker, then you can make the stock quicker. Add your bones first, then veggies, and water to the max fill line. Cook on High for 60 minutes, let pressure come down naturally, then strain.
      Stock is great to enhance the flavor of rice & quinoa too.

  8. Amie

    Love making soup, so this is helpful to be able to do ahead.

  9. Courtney

    Wow! What a great idea! I am always buying individual Campbell’s soups for school lunches in the winter, but they can really add up. I am excited to try these in lunch boxes!

  10. Ann

    thanks for the idea!! love it!! gracias gracias!

  11. Lisa

    This is a great idea. I didn’t know you could frreze mason jars. I don’t make soup because it will go to waste at my house. Now I can make a big pot for me and save it.

    • Lina D

      Perfect! Look for the mason jars that say freezer safe such as Kerr or ball 👍

  12. Lyn

    I like to can leftover soup with my pressure canner! The soup stays tender, is shelf stable, and is easy to give as a meal with some bread to an elderly neighbor, first-time-mom, etc.

    • Lina D

      Oh that’s so great!

  13. Simone

    I made taco soup last night and put them in jars, I let them cool first before putting in freezer ,but when I checked them today they had some ice crystals on the inside already, It is just at the top on the sides of the jar. I only filled them about 3/4 full . Is this ok , bc I dont want them to be freezer burnt

    • Simone

      oh, and is the seal/lid suppose to have that bubble on top flat or is it ok for it to be popped up? I know when canning they are suppose to be down until first opening. All mine are up.

      • Olivia

        @Simone- the lid will only go down when it is heat processed. (Canned.) It is fine for the bubble to be up when it is frozen.

    • Olivia

      Don’t worry about the ice crystals. My soups do that. Before I thaw them, I just rinse the crystals off the top with fresh water, then let it thaw. It tastes fine!

  14. Cindy

    Are there different mason jars to freeze rather then can. Thanks

  15. Barb

    What a fantastic idea. I am trying to stop using plastic but the glass storage containers add up. I a doing this from now on. Also love the freezer storage idea

    • Lina D (Hip2Save Sidekick)

      Thanks Barb!

  16. Lisa E

    What about making a basic chicken soup, freeze then cook and add pasta, rice or potatoes in separately when you reheat. I’ve always had bad luck with leaving noodles in soup when storing. Noodles get bloated and you have no liquid remaining. I’ve tried different noodle types with the same results.

    • Lina D (Hip2Save Sidekick)

      I think that is such a great idea!

  17. Keyko182

    I eat a ton of yogurt. I freeze all my stock, pasta sauce and soups in those. I wrote on them with a sharpie and love that I can give them away and not worry about getting my containers back

  18. Megan

    can you post how to make your chicken lemon orzo soup please I am someone just starting out making soups

  19. Patricia Goff

    What a great idea. I love soup but my gang doesn’t. I can freeze some for me whenever I want some. What a great idea. Beef stew is the only one they will eat but I guess that isn’t technically a soup. LOL

  20. Lisa

    I am loving this post! This is exactly the information I’ve been looking for. I eat a lot of lentil soup for the huge amounts of vitamins like folate. I just started learning that lentils need to be soaked before cooking. It removes the gassiness. I’d like to see a post on this. So far I’ve just use apple cider vinegar. I’d like to know what other people are using to soak lentils.

    • Lina D (Hip2Save Sidekick)

      Oh awesome thanks for the feedback and ideas!

  21. Pat

    Use a canning funnel to make it even easier to fill the jars (or to use regular mouth mason jars). No mess!

    • Lina D (Hip2Save Sidekick)

      Great tip! Thanks Pat!

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